• Research, Theory, and Analysis

    For years now, this phrase has been the tagline for Ideas & Perspectives, our flagship publication. The phrase not only reflects the content of our advisory letter, but it resides at the core of Independent School Management’s raison d'être—supporting private-independent school leaders.

Right Sizing the Classroom 1

Right-Sizing the Classroom: Making the Most of Great Teachers

Released in November 2013. This study, published by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, addresses the issue of class size and teacher-student ratios—with a policy recommendation. “Public schooling in America suffers from a triple problem that a single policy solution might solve: 1) Our best teachers aren’t paid enough, 2) not enough kids benefit from great teachers, and 3) too many are stuck with weak teachers. This paper describes—and demonstrates the value of—a change in policy that could address all three issues at once, and could be done at no additional cost to taxpayers. Following this route, however, means reversing position on a widely popular—but pricey and none too effective—approach to “educational improvement”: class size reduction. Instead of trying to keep classes small, we should be leveraging our existing teacher talent by enlarging the classes taught by our best instructors—and compensating these excellent teachers for the extra work involved.”

Who Considers Teaching 1

Who Considers Teaching and Who Teaches?—First-Time 2007-08 Bachelor's Degree Recipients by Teaching Status 1 Year After Graduation

Released in November 2013. This study, published by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, addresses the issue of class size and teacher-student ratios—with a policy recommendation. “Public schooling in America suffers from a triple problem that a single policy solution might solve: 1) Our best teachers aren’t paid enough, 2) not enough kids benefit from great teachers, and 3) too many are stuck with weak teachers. This paper describes—and demonstrates the value of—a change in policy that could address all three issues at once, and could be done at no additional cost to taxpayers. Following this route, however, means reversing position on a widely popular—but pricey and none too effective—approach to “educational improvement”: class size reduction. Instead of trying to keep classes small, we should be leveraging our existing teacher talent by enlarging the classes taught by our best instructors—and compensating these excellent teachers for the extra work involved.”

State_of_the_States_2013_Using_Teacher_Evaluations_NCTQ_Report October 2013 1

Connect the Dots: Using Evaluations of Teacher Effectiveness to Inform Policy and Practice

Released on October 2013. The National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has long advocated that any meaningful understanding of “effective” teaching must be rooted in results for kids. Whatever else they accomplish in the classroom, effective teachers improve student achievement. It seems like common sense. Yet, until recently, it has been an exceptional way of thinking about teacher quality, totally out of step with teacher policy across the states. As part of the annual State Teacher Policy Yearbook, NCTQ has systematically collected and analyzed state policies on teacher preparation, training, retention, compensation and other personnel policies. In this paper we provide: (1) a detailed and up-to-date lay of the land on teacher evaluation policies across the 50 states and the District of Columbia Public Schools; (2) an in-depth look at policy in states promising ambitious teacher evaluation systems (states requiring student growth and achievement to be a significant or the most significant factor in teacher ratings), including states’ efforts to “connect the dots” and use teacher evaluation results in meaningful ways to inform policy and practice; and (3) a compilation of some of the important lessons learned, pitfalls and successes states have experienced on the road to improving teacher evaluation systems.

2013 Ideas and Perspectives Reader Survey   Analysis of Results (August Update)   Independent School Management 1

2013 I&P Readership Survey—Analysis of Results

Released in September 2013. This report provides a summary of the results of the Ideas & Perspectives Reader Survey administered by Hanover Research in 2013. Over 92% of respondents checked either “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” when presented with the statement that articles are “well-written and readable.” This report covers the highlights of the survey responses, respondent demographics, the overall results (represented in graphs and figures), and the open-ended responses from the survey participants.

Beginning Teacher Longitudinal

Strategies for Longitudinal Analysis of the Career Paths of Beginning Teachers: Results From the First Through Fourth Waves of the 2007-08 Beginning Teacher Longitudinal Study

Released in August 2013. To learn more about the early career patterns of beginning teachers, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) of the Institute of Education Sciences within the U.S. Department of Education undertook the Beginning Teacher Longitudinal Study (BTLS). BTLS is a nationally representative longitudinal study of public school teachers who began teaching in 2007 or 2008. It provides data on teacher characteristics (e.g., age and gender) and attitudes (e.g., teacher satisfaction) of teachers who stay in the prekindergarten through 12th-grade teaching profession and those who leave teaching. The survey also collects data on teachers' mobility across schools and/or districts. In addition, data on school characteristics (e.g., community type) are collected. The BTLS, therefore, provides researchers with the opportunity to examine the career paths of beginning teachers as well as factors that may influence those paths.

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Characteristics of Public and Private Elementary and Secondary Schools in the United States: Results From the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey

Released in August 2013. This report presents selected findings from the Public School and Private School Data Files of the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is a nationally representative sample survey of public and private K-12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The purpose of SASS is to collect information that can provide a detailed picture of U.S. elementary and secondary schools and their staff. The selected samples include about 3,000 private schools and their principals; and 7,100 private school teachers.

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