• Research, Theory, and Analysis

    For years now, this phrase has been the tagline for Ideas & Perspectives, our flagship publication. The phrase not only reflects the content of our advisory letter, but it resides at the core of Independent School Management’s raison d'être—supporting private-independent school leaders.

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Improving Post-High School Outcomes for Transition-Age Students with Disabilities: An Evidence Review

Released in August 2013 Nearly four decades have passed since the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) ensured access to public education for students with disabilities in the United States. During the years following its adoption, there was growing recognition that to lead productive and fulfilling lives as adults, many students need support in the transition from secondary school to post-high school environments. Despite the efforts of policymakers and practitioners, a gap remains between post-high school outcomes of students with disabilities and outcomes for other students. To help close that gap, this report reviews the research literature on programs (strategies, interventions, or sets of services) designed to help students with disabilities make transitions. Although written for public school teachers and staff, much of the research has implications in private school settings as well.

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Progress on Childhood Obesity

Released in August 6, 2013. Obese children are more likely to become obese adults and suffer lifelong physical and mental health problems. According to the latest statistics from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), obesity rates in low-income preschoolers, after decades of rising, began to level off from 2003 through 2008 and now are showing small declines in many states.

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Parent and Family Involvement in Education, From the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012

Released in August 2013. This report presents data on students in the United States attending kindergarten through grade 12. The main focus of the report is on parents and family involvement in the students' education during the 2011-12 school year as reported by the students' parents. It also includes the percentage of students who participated in family activities, as well as the number of children who were homeschooled. Demographic information about students and families is presented. The data for this report come from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012 (NHES:2012), Parents and Family Involvement in Education (PFI) Survey. The PFI survey is designed for students who are enrolled in kindergarten through grade 12 or are homeschooled for equivalent grades and asks questions about various aspects of parent involvement in education. For homeschooled students, the survey asks questions related to the student's homeschooling experiences, the sources of the curriculum, and the reasons for homeschooling.

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The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing is Taught in Schools

Released in July 16, 2013. In a survey of 2,462 Advanced Placement and National Writing Project teachers, a majority say digital tools encourage students to be more invested in their writing by encouraging personal expression and providing a wider audience for their work. Most also say digital tools make teaching writing easier, despite an increasingly ambiguous line between formal and informal writing and students’ poor understanding of issues such as plagiarism and fair use. These teachers see the internet and digital technologies such as social networking sites, cell phones and texting, generally facilitating teens’ personal expression and creativity, broadening the audience for their written material, and encouraging teens to write more often in more formats than may have been the case in prior generations. At the same time, they describe the unique challenges of teaching writing in the digital age, including the "creep" of informal style into formal writing assignments and the need to better educate students about issues such as plagiarism and fair use.

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America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2013

Released in July 2013. Each year since 1997, the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics has published a report on the well-being of children and families. Indicators are chosen because they are easy to understand, are based on substantial research connecting them to child well-being, cut across important areas of children’s lives, are measured regularly so that they can be updated and show trends over time, and represent large segments of the population, rather than one particular group. These child well-being indicators span seven domains: Family and Social Environment, Economic Circumstances, Health Care, Physical Environment and Safety, Behavior, Education, and Health. The “Special Feature” in this edition concerns “The Kindergarten Year.”

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Synthesis of IES Research on Early Intervention and Early Childhood Education

Released in July 2013. The purpose of this synthesis is to describe what has been learned from research grants on early intervention and childhood education funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) National Center for Education Research and National Center for Special Education Research and published in peer-reviewed outlets through June 2010. The report looks across the projects that IES funded to determine what has been learned and to suggest to the field avenues for further research to support improvements in early childhood education in our country.

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