• In this issue of Ideas & Perspectives,

    we discuss why college prep is not enough, application processes for international students, and how constituent relations fits into the three Spheres of Influence.

Recent Articles

Foster Board Objectivity—Avoid Subjectivity

Trustees are human beings, and from a strategic viewpoint, human nature can impede or disrupt a Board’s key functions. One term that captures much of this problematic dimension of human nature is subjectivity.

For Board members, subjectivity may lead to an overlying personalized way of seeing organizational purpose, envisioning the school’s future, and determining planning priorities. Subjectivity can easily undermine the strategic thinking needed to preserve school mission, ensure organizational stability, and lead a school into the future. Increases in tension or anxiety on the Board may contribute to increased subjectivity.

Yet More Growth in the Charter School Population

The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools supports and lobbies for charter schools at the state and federal levels. The organization’s latest annual report indicates that more than three million students now attend public charter schools. That’s nearly three times the student population of a decade ago. There are now more than 6,900 charter schools in the United States. Clearly there has been demonstrated growth in that sector.

Facebook Ads Strengthen Your School’s Story

Facebook is the go-to social media outlet for sharing your messages, offers, and events with your community. The once free social giant has changed its algorithm several times over the years, making communications more challenging for companies and losing some of it’s support along the way. However, it remains at the top of the pyramid for social advertising strategies, so we are forced to reignite our love for its capabilities.

Your School’s Newsletter: Is It Informational or Considered Junk Mail?

Regardless of whether your school sends out an electronic or printed newsletter, if it’s not perceived as informational and relevant, it may be seen as just another piece of junk mail. And, if your families, faculty, and staff aren’t reading it, then they’re missing what you’re trying to share with them.

The True Benefits of Preschool

Perhaps your school has a preschool, or is thinking about adding one. Perhaps you see preschool as a doorway into full enrollment at your school. But is it worth it? In short, does it meet the needs of your families, your students, and your school’s mission?

Academic leaders, parents, and researchers believe a quality preschool program improves skills like simple math and phonics, and prepares children for the social and emotional behaviors as they enter kindergarten and elementary school. For example, a study in Virginia last year, including more than 20,000 students in a government-funded preschool program, indicated that children in the system showed great improvements in alphabet recognition. But do the benefits of preschool extend into student experience in later schooling?

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